Auditory spatial deficits following hemispheric lesions: Dissociation of explicit and implicit processing.

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2012

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info:eu-repo/semantics/altIdentifier/doi/10.1080/09602011.2012.686818

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info:eu-repo/semantics/altIdentifier/pmid/22672110

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info:eu-repo/semantics/altIdentifier/eissn/1464-0694

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info:eu-repo/semantics/altIdentifier/urn/urn:nbn:ch:serval-BIB_382A3DB7CA087

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C. Duffour-Nikolov et al., « Auditory spatial deficits following hemispheric lesions: Dissociation of explicit and implicit processing. », Serveur académique Lausannois, ID : 10.1080/09602011.2012.686818


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Abstract 0

Auditory spatial deficits occur frequently after hemispheric damage; a previous case report suggested that the explicit awareness of sound positions, as in sound localisation, can be impaired while the implicit use of auditory cues for the segregation of sound objects in noisy environments remains preserved. By assessing systematically patients with a first hemispheric lesion, we have shown that (1) explicit and/or implicit use can be disturbed; (2) impaired explicit vs. preserved implicit use dissociations occur rather frequently; and (3) different types of sound localisation deficits can be associated with preserved implicit use. Conceptually, the dissociation between the explicit and implicit use may reflect the dual-stream dichotomy of auditory processing. Our results speak in favour of systematic assessments of auditory spatial functions in clinical settings, especially when adaptation to auditory environment is at stake. Further, systematic studies are needed to link deficits of explicit vs. implicit use to disability in everyday activities, to design appropriate rehabilitation strategies, and to ascertain how far the explicit and implicit use of spatial cues can be retrained following brain damage.

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